2023

PayEm’s landing page is short, concise and conveys professionalism.

But the vague and noncommittal messaging, combined with the subdued design, create a generic feel that could cause the company to become easily forgettable.

Hero Section

No alt text provided for this image

This hero section as a whole is well designed, with the right visual hierarchy:

  • The layout is familiar
  • The big heading stands out enough to be read first
  • The colors on the Calls to Action (CTAs) are contrasting exactly the right amount to pull the visitor’s attention to them. Yellow CTA first, blue CTA second.
  • The logo strip is colorless, conveying credibility without the colorful mess of the original logos.

The problem is that PayEm take the familiarity a little too far.

The super generic image doesn’t help the visitor understand much about the product (except that it’s a dashboard), and the heading doesn’t really help either.

As I mentioned in a previous teardown, adjectives like “Agile” and “Scalable” are vague and don’t commit to anything, so they don’t contribute to our message. Visitors ignore them.

Saying that something is “great” isn’t really saying anything, right?

So all I get from this heading is that they do finance and procurement. That's something, but not much. So I think PayEm could squeeze a lot more value from their hero section.

Features Section

No alt text provided for this image

If the hero section is the “what” and “why”, the feature section is the “how”. And it’s a bit too early in the website for this information.

A website should answer 4 questions for the customer:

  1. What problem can you solve for me?
  2. Can you really do what you say?
  3. Can I afford it?
  4. What’s the next step?

Notice that “how does it work” is not one of them, because assuming these 4 questions are answered, it doesn't really matter yet.

Showing the features does help with question number 2. But is not so critical at that point.

Also - the default state of this section shows only 1 feature, counting on the user to click buttons to show the rest of them.

Counting on users to take action in order to get important information is not a good idea. If the information is not important, it should be left out.

Benefits Section

No alt text provided for this image

Here, again, the lack of concrete information in the headings is a wasted opportunity.

Every heading in your website is a chance to say something meaningful that will push visitors towards becoming customers.

What does “Scale your business to unprecedented levels” really say?

I’m not an expert on PayEm’s business, but my guess is that “scaling the business to unprecedented levels” is not their customers’ top concern.

People care and worry about very specific things, like:

“My procurement department’s approval process takes way too long”

“Our CFO is always swamped and never has time to look at the details of each invoice”.

The closer we match the customer’s thoughts and inner voice - the better we can persuade them that we are the solution.

Credibility Section

No alt text provided for this image

This type of content is important for answering question number 2 (“can you really do what you say?”).

Having said that, I might not be the target audience for these G2 badges, so they don’t say that much to me. But I do feel like having so many of them together makes them seem to carry less weight.

Having 20 smiley faces from your teacher makes it seem like getting them is super easy. And what does each of them individually really mean?

I’d focus on the strongest 1/3 and showcase them along with a text emphasizing their meaning.

Testimonials Section

No alt text provided for this image

This is a well executed section.

The customers have full names, roles and profile pictures - which helps the visitor empathize with them and believe them.

Adding a video for the main testimonial is also a nice touch.

Videos are a great marketing tool, simply because they are super easy to consume. People love easy.

The problem here is that the visitor is not given any motivation to click on the video, and it does not auto play.

Check out how Jiga handled this perfectly in their landing page.

Call to Action Section

No alt text provided for this image

This is the classic place for a CTA section, but the messaging here can be considerably improved.

I also wonder why the CTA itself is “Chat with us” and not “book a demo”, since it seems like the latter the main CTA.

Landing pages should have exactly 2 CTAs - a direct (main) CTA, and a transitional (secondary) CTA. Which should be replicated across the site.

  1. Direct CTA - A direct ask from the visitor to buy, or move towards becoming a customer. “Start today”, “Call us now”, “Sign up”.
  2. Transitional CTA - A softer ask. For visitors who are interested, but still not ready to commit.

The CTAs should match the company's goals. The more important the goal → the more emphasized the CTA should be.

Summary

PayEm’s landing page is short, concise and conveys professionalism.

But the vague and noncommittal messaging, combined with the subdued design create a generic feel that could cause the company to become easily forgettable.

Landing Page Reviews

If you've ever wondered why some sites look “wow” and others look “meh” - These are for you.

Walkthroughs (Coming Soon)

The thinking behind Gambit's work

Get a website that sells

Start making the right impression and closing deals.

Contact us